Project

Evaluating Future Effects of Climate and Land Use on Fisheries Production in Inland Lakes

Project Summary

Affiliation(s): NCCWSC

Principal Investigator(s):
  • David Bunnell (Great Lakes Science Center)

Inland fisheries are critical for global food security and human well-being. However, fish production may be threatened by changes in climate and land use. Understanding this threat is crucial to effectively manage inland fisheries in the future. To address this need, this project will identify which types of lakes across the globe are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate and land use changes. Lakes will be categorized based on their depth, vulnerability to food insecurity, and vulnerability to water insecurity – variables which can all influence how detrimental climate and land use change will actually be on a lake. This information will be used to predict how inland fisheries production might change under different future scenarios of climate and land use change.

Haiyaha Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado - Credit: Alan Cressler

Affiliation(s): NCCWSC

Principal Investigator(s):
  • David Bunnell (Great Lakes Science Center)

Start Date: March 2016

End Date: September 2018

Project Status: In Progress

Tags: inland fisheries, climate change, land use, time series, global impact, freshwater fisheries, Wildlife and Plants, Water and Ice, Fish, Rivers, Streams and Lakes, CSC, NCCWSC, 2016

Fiscal Year: FY 2016 Projects

Publications & Other

  • Assessing the influence of watershed characteristics on chlorophyll a in waterbodies at global and regional scales

        • Climate change as a long-term stressor for the fisheries of the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America