NCCWSC Climate Change Science and Management Webinar Series

The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center is partnering with the National Conservation Training Center to offer the "Climate Change Science and Management Webinar Series" to highlight NCCWSC and Climate Science Center sponsored science projects related to climate change impacts and adaptation. This webinar series was developed to inform scientists, land and resource managers, and the general public about potential and predicted climate change impacts on fish and wildlife and to help guide resource management decisions across the United States. Instructions for joining the webinars will be provided in advance on the corresponding pages (see below). Video recordings with closed captioning are made available approximately 2 weeks after each presentation. Please see the schedule of upcoming webinars below. To search for information on a specific topic, please use our website search

If you have questions about the NCCWSC webinar series, please contact:

Upcoming Webinars

Arch Cave, Florida
Karst, critters, and climate change: A multidisciplinary evaluation of karst species vulnerability to climate change

Tue, 10/25/2016, 3:00 PM EDT (Register)

  • Speaker(s):
    • Barbara Mahler, U.S. Geological Survey
    One-half of North American imperiled species live in subterranean habitats, which largely are associated with karst (a type of landscape underlain by limestone that has been eroded over time, producing caves, sinkholes... (Read More)
Alaska Mountains and Forest
The Surprising Role of Trees in the Boreal Water Cycle

Tue, 11/15/2016, 3:00 PM EST (Register)

  • Speaker(s):
    • Jessie Young-Robertson and Uma Bhatt, University of Alaska Fairbanks
    Approximately 25 to 50 percent of a living tree is made up of water, depending on the species and time of year. The water stored in trees has previously been considered just a minor part of the water cycle, but a study... (Read More)

Previous Webinars

Sprague River Basin, Oregon
A Framework for Evaluating the Vulnerability of Multiple Wildlife Species to Climate Change at Regional Scales
  • Speaker(s):
    • Meryl Mims, U.S. Geological Survey
    Frameworks for evaluating the vulnerability of multiple species to decline or extinction are increasingly needed by state and local agencies that are tasked with managing many species at once. USGS researchers in the... (Read More)
Wind River
Co-producing Science and Tools for Drought Preparedness with the Wind River Reservation's Tribal Water Managers
  • Speaker(s):
    • Shannon McNeeley, Colorado State University; North Central CSC
    The Wind River Reservation in west-central Wyoming is home of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Tribes. The reservation has experienced severe drought impacts on Tribal livelihoods and cultural activities in... (Read More)
Upper Whitehorse Creek, Southeastern, OR
Understanding Water Availability Across Landscapes in a Time of Increasing Drought
  • Speaker(s):
    • Jason Dunham, USGS Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
    The permanence of stream flow in stream networks is a critical driver of water quality, in-stream and riparian ecological processes, and downstream water availability.  Scientists currently know remarkably little,... (Read More)
Trees and Snow
How Will Forests Affect Mountain Snow Storage in a Warming Climate?
  • Speaker(s):
    • Susan E. Dickerson-Lange, University of Washington
    Forests strongly influence snow processes and affect the amount and duration of snow storage on a landscape. Therefore, forest changes, from management activities or natural disturbances, have important consequences for... (Read More)
Man looking out at sea
Recreational Seascapes: Integrating Human and Mechanical Observations on Hawaiʻi Island
  • Speaker(s):
    • Noelani Puniwai, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo
    Seascapes symbolize both the physical dimensions of ocean and coastal areas, as well as the meanings humans ascribe to their observations, interactions, and relationships to the sea. In Hawaiʻi, seascapes are... (Read More)